Adolph Menzel
Adolph Menzel's Oil Paintings
Adolph Menzel Museum
December 8, 1815 Breslau - February 9, 1905 Berlin.

About Us
email

90,680 paintings total now
Toll Free: 1-877-240-4507

  
  

Adolph Menzel.org, welcome & enjoy!
Adolph Menzel.org
 

Frida Kahlo
The self-portrait of artist and monkey
mk118 1932 Oil on canvas
ID: 37145

Frida Kahlo The self-portrait of artist and monkey
Go Back!



Frida Kahlo The self-portrait of artist and monkey


Go Back!


 

Frida Kahlo

1907-54 Mexican painter, b. Coyoacen. As a result of an accident at age 15, Kahlo turned her attention from a medical career to painting. Drawing on her personal experiences, her works are often shocking in their stark portrayal of pain and the harsh lives of women. Fifty-five of her 143 paintings are self-portraits incorporating a personal symbolism complete with graphic anatomical references. She was also influenced by indigenous Mexican culture, aspects of which she portrayed in bright colors, with a mixture of realism and symbolism. Her paintings attracted the attention of the artist Diego Rivera, whom she later married. Although Kahlo's work is sometimes classified as surrealist and she did exhibit several times with European surrealists, she herself disputed the label. Her preoccupation with female themes and the figurative candor with which she expressed them made her something of a feminist cult figure in the last decades of the 20th cent.   Related Paintings of Frida Kahlo :. | Abstract | Roots | Cocnut Tears | Window Display in Detroit | Viva la Vida |
Related Artists:
John William North,ARA
1842-1924
Kate Clark
1875-1922
William Scrots
William (or Guillim) Scrots (or Scrotes or Stretes) (active 1537-1553) was a painter of the Tudor court and an exponent of the Mannerist style of painting in the Netherlands. He is first heard of when appointed a court painter to Mary of Habsburg, Regent of the Netherlands, in 1537. In England, he followed Hans Holbein as King's Painter to Henry VIII in 1546, with a substantial annual salary of £62 10s, over twice as much as Holbein's thirty pounds a year. He continued in this role during the reign of the boy king Edward VI. His salary was stopped on Edward's death in 1553, after which it is not known what became of him, though it is presumed he left England. Edward VI, attributed to Scrots, Hampton Court. Portrait of Edward VI in distorted perspective, 1546.Little more is known of Scrots than that his paintings showed an interest in ingenious techniques and detailed accessories. Scrots was paid 50 marks in 1551 for three "great tables", two of which were portraits of Edward delivered to the ambassadors Thomas Hoby and John Mason as gifts for foreign monarchs, and the third a "picture of the late earle of Surrey attainted." Two full-length portraits of Edward VI in a pose similar to that of Holbein's portrait of his father, one now in the Royal Collection (left) and another now in the Louvre (below), are attributed to Scrots and are likely to be these two paintings. Scrots also painted an anamorphic profile of Edward VI, distorted so that it is impossible to view it normally except from a special angle to the side. This optical trick is similar to that used by Holbein in his painting The Ambassadors and in contemporary portraits of Francis I and Ferdinand I. Later, when the painting was exhibited at Whitehall Palace in the winter of 1591-92, it created a sensation, and important visitors were all taken to see it.






Adolph Menzel
All the Adolph Menzel's Oil Paintings




Supported by oil paintings and picture frames 



Copyright Reserved