Adolph Menzel
Adolph Menzel's Oil Paintings
Adolph Menzel Museum
December 8, 1815 Breslau - February 9, 1905 Berlin.

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Pieter Aertsen
kristus och aktenskapsbryterskan
olja på duk 122x180 se
ID: 69132

Pieter Aertsen kristus och aktenskapsbryterskan
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Pieter Aertsen kristus och aktenskapsbryterskan


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Pieter Aertsen

1508-1575 Flemish Pieter Aertsen Galleries Dutch painter and draughtsman, active also in the southern Netherlands. He probably trained in his native Amsterdam but early on moved to Antwerp, where he enrolled in the Guild of St Luke as a master in 1535. In 1542 he was granted citizenship of the city. Among his pupils in Antwerp were Johannes Stradanus and later Joachim Beuckelaer, a cousin of the artist wife and his most loyal follower. The earliest known work by Aertsen is a triptych with the Crucifixion (c. 1545-6; Antwerp, Maagdenhuismus.) for the van den Biest Almshouse in Antwerp. From 1550 Aertsen development can be traced through a large number of signed and dated paintings. Religious works, mostly intended for churches, must have formed an important part of Aertsen output. His early paintings seem to have been strongly influenced by other Antwerp artists, as can be seen in the van den Biest triptych, where the figures are close to those in Jan Sanders van Hemessen background scenes. Van Hemessen influence is also strong in the pair of triptychs showing the Seven Sorrows of the Virgin and the Seven Joys of the Virgin (the latter dated 1554; both Zoutleeuw, St Leonard).   Related Paintings of Pieter Aertsen :. | Market Scene | Vendor of Fowl | Market Woman with Vegetable Stall | Museums national market woman at the Gemusestand | Cook |
Related Artists:
Suzanne Valadon
French Post-Impressionist Painter, 1865-1938 French painter and artist's model. She led a lonely childhood in Paris as the daughter of an unmarried and unaffectionate maid, seeking refuge from her bleak circumstances by living in a dream world. While residing in the Montmartre district of Paris, she became an artist's model, working in particular with those painters who frequented the Lapin Agile. From 1880 to 1887, for example, she sat regularly for Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, posing for both the male and female figures in the Sacred Wood (1884-6; Lyon, Mus. B.-A.). She also modelled for Renoir, Luigi Zandomeneghi, Th?ophile Steinlein, Jean-Louis Forain, Giuseppe De Nittis and Jean-Jacques Henner. No longer able to tolerate the passive role of the model,
William Frederick Yeames,RA
1835-1918 English painter. The son of a British consul in Russia, Yeames was sent to school in Dresden after the death of his father in 1842. He also studied painting there. The collapse of the Yeames family fortune resulted in a move to London in 1848, where Yeames learnt anatomy and composition from George Scharf (1788-1860). He later took lessons from F. A. Westmacott. In 1852 he continued his artistic education in Florence under Enrico Pollastrini and Raphael Buonajuto, from whom he learnt the methods of the Old Masters. He drew from frescoes by Ghirlandaio, Gozzoli and Andrea del Sarto and painted in the Life School at the Grand Ducal Academy. He then went to Rome and made landscape studies and copied Old Masters, including Raphael's frescoes in the Vatican. His extensive study of Italian art gave him a precision and facility that assisted his artistic success upon his return to London in 1859. There he set up a studio in Park Place and became involved with the ST JOHN'S WOOD CLIQUE. He exhibited at the Royal Academy and the British Institution from 1859 and became an ARA in 1866.
Morgan, Evelyn De
English, 1855-1919 Painter, wife of William De Morgan. She was a pupil of her uncle, the painter Roddam Spencer Stanhope. In 1873-5 she attended the Slade School of Art, London. While there, she was awarded a Slade scholarship entitling her to financial assistance for three years. The scholarship required that she draw in charcoal from the nude, but she eventually declined it because she did not wish to continue working in this technique, although she excelled in it. She was influenced by the work of the Pre-Raphaelite artists and became a follower of Burne-Jones. In 1877 she first exhibited at the Grosvenor Gallery, London, and continued to show there thereafter. From 1875 she spent several winters in Florence working and studying; some of her work is reminiscent of Botticelli, possibly because of her visits to Florence. She often depicted women in unfamiliar ways though in a manner more in tune with a female perspective.






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